CM: WGP Credit – Household Hazardous Waste Reduction and Engagement Program

WGP Credit: Household Hazardous Waste Reduction and Engagement Program 

(1 Point, Reciprocal)

Credit Summary

This credit aims to provide a platform for educating the public about HHW. This will allow the public to have multiple avenues for HHW reduction to minimize potential human health impacts and pollution.

Impact Summary

These programs will assist in resolving an issue that has been going on for decades now. There will be a great reduction in the rate of damage caused by HHW regarding people and the environment. 

Submittal Summary

To meet this requirement, you must upload materials disseminated by mailer, bill stuffer or other mass communication method that reaches over 80% of the residents & businesses in the local government jurisdiction.

Case Study and Benefits

As seen below, Logan County implemented a Center for Hard to Recycle Material (CHARM). It is a convenient drive through disposal outlet located on the same property as the Logan County Material Recovery Facility, which allows for efficient turn-over of the recycled materials. Logan County has found that the drive through structure is more affordable and effective than occasional large-scale collections because it requires low maintenance, little staff time, and few expenses. 

Logan County has also implemented many education and outreach programs to advertise CHARM and teach residents about HHW. These programs include a recycling program in the schools, a digital comment box, frequent staff interactions with the public and regular distribution of fliers, and radio ads introducing the concept to residents. 

Embed calculators in different sections of chapters (in how to meet the requirements). Maybe not a calculator here but a link to them or default values (if you have x we are assuming y% of residents have access). Clarify the potential to reach residents doesn’t mean they actually read it 

Intent and Requirements

Intent

Educate the public on existing Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) infrastructure and available avenues for HHW reduction in order to minimize potential negative human health impacts and pollution of the natural environment.

Local Government & Industry Requirements

Demonstrate that the information about household hazardous waste programs has the potential to reach 80-90 percent of residents within the Local Government’s jurisdiction or Company’s service area. 

The Big Picture

Additional section on background/intent. Why of the why, Why of the intent, 

Why We Care

Household Hazardous Waste contains toxic chemicals with severe health ramifications. In the 1970s, it was discovered that a company had improperly disposed of chemicals in Love Canal, New York and many children in the area were born with birth defects. This tragedy led to the creation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, which is a federal law that mandates the safe disposal of solid and hazardous waste. 

This credit asks companies and jurisdictions to provide guidance to the majority (80-90%) within the service territory about how to properly handle and dispose of Household Hazardous Waste. Jurisdictions are asked to submit samples of HHW programs that educate residents and collect materials. 

Logan County, Ohio built a HHW facility in 2009, called the Center for Hard to Recycle Material (CHARM). To educate and engage their residents, they have created many programs such as an informative website, radio ads, and brochures. The creation of CHARM led to HHW program costs decreasing from $46,000 to $7,383 and diversion of HHW increasing from 24.93 tons to 60.40 tons. 

How to Meet the Requirements 

Potential Strategies:

  • Create a list of materials considered household hazardous waste and how to properly dispose (i.e. drop-off or pickup) through an engaging platform (i.e. website) and publish to citizens.
  • Upload a list of products that meet the EPA Safer Choice Standard (https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice/products)
    • Why it is important to upload safer products/good example
  • Publish activities, lessons, and/or worksheets that explain household hazardous waste and the danger of exposure designed for children.
  • Include ‘bill stuffers’ for utility (electricity, water, sewer, trash, etc.) bills, tax bills or other regular communication with residents.
    • Example: Water Environment Federation Bill Stuffers “Ever Wonder Where It Goes?” 
    • Example: Indiana Department of Environmental Management Bill Stuffers “Open Dumping”
  • Post notices in local print, visual and online media.
    • Tips
      • Aim for consistency, not frequency
      • Quality over quantity
    • 3 times per week so that you reach them without annoying them 
  • Create an adjunct hazardous waste collection facility, such as Logan County’s CHARM Facility that is on the same property as the Logan County Material Recovery Facility to allow for efficient turn-over of recycled materials (Another bullet on what an adjunct facility would look like based on logan county’s charm.)

Required Documentation

Upload materials disseminated by mailer, bill stuffer or other mass communication method that reaches over 80% of the residents & businesses in the local government jurisdiction.

Default Assumptions: 

  • Opt Out Information reaches 80-90% of residents

Case Studies & In-Depth Information

Logan County, Ohio built a Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) facility in 2009, called the Center for Hard to Recycle Material (CHARM). It is a convenient drive through disposal outlet located on the same property as the Logan County Material Recovery Facility, which allows for efficient turn-over of the recycled materials. Logan County has found that the drive through structure is more affordable and effective than occasional large-scale collections because it requires low maintenance, little staff time, and few expenses. 

Logan County has implemented many education and outreach programs to advertise CHARM and teach residents about HHW. These programs include a recycling program in the schools, a digital comment box, frequent staff interactions with the public and regular distribution of fliers, and radio ads introducing the concept to residents. The District has included a section on their website titled “What Can I do With…” that includes extensive recycling options for different common materials. Logan County also created a Youtube video that guides viewers through the CHARM Facility and explains the process of unloading and sorting the HHW. All of the local scrap businesses have CHARM brochures to hand out to direct people in their recycling needs. 

Prior to the creation of CHARM, Logan County’s diversion rate was 18%, and by 2011 it was 41.77%. In 2006, the District reported that the HHW program cost over $46,000, and in 2011 it dropped to $7,382.79 through the opening of CHARM. Diversion of HHW also dramatically increased from 24.93 tons in 2010 to 60.40 tons in 2011. 

Referenced Standards

  • EPA Safer Choice Standard 
  • Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)

EPA Definition: The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is the public law that creates the framework for the proper management of hazardous and non-hazardous solid waste. The law describes the waste management program mandated by Congress that gave EPA authority to develop the RCRA program. The term RCRA is often used interchangeably to refer to the law, regulations and EPA policy and guidance. 

Definitions

Bill Stuffers

Financial Dictionary Definition: Marketing material sent in the mail along with a regular bill. This allows a company to maximize its advertisements at the lowest possible price because it does not have to pay for extra postage.

EPA Safer Choice Standard

EPA Definition: The Safer Choice Standard, formerly known as DfE’s Standard for Safer Products (or the “DfE Standard”) identifies the requirements products and their ingredients must meet to earn the Safer Choice label.

Hazardous Waste

EPA Definition: Hazardous waste is waste that is dangerous or potentially harmful to our health or the environment. Hazardous wastes can be liquids, solids, gases, or sludges. They can be discarded commercial products, like cleaning fluids or pesticides, or the by-products of manufacturing processes.

Household Hazardous Waste (HHW)

EPA Definition: leftover household products that can catch fire, react, or explode under certain circumstances, or that are corrosive or toxic. Products, such as paints, cleaners, oils, batteries, and pesticides can contain hazardous ingredients and require special care when you dispose of them.

Back To Top