CM: PCR Credit-Renewable or Alternative Fueled Onsite Mobile Equipment and Recovery Facilities 

The Big Picture

PCR Credit: Renewable or Alternative Fueled Onsite Mobile Equipment and Recovery Facilities 

(1 Point, Reciprocal)

Credit Summary

The goal of this credit is to reduce the atmospheric emission associated with recovery of solid waste and promote renewable and low-carbon intensity alternatives to non-renewable transportation fuels. 

Impact Summary

Onsite mobile equipment contributes significantly to the atmospheric emissions of waste processing. In addition to fuel-consuming vehicles and machines that facilitate solid waste recovery, the process of anaerobic digestion releases significant amounts of methane, a detrimental greenhouse gas. This credit would include the use of alternatively-fueled on-site vehicles and equipment to alleviate the environmental impact of waste facilities while also encouraging the recycling of byproduct gases. 

Submittal Summary

To achieve this credit, a facility can demonstrate use of renewable fuels or alternative/low carbon fuels. A facility achieves this credit if 30% or more of the on-site vehicles utilize renewable fuels or 30% of total vehicles use renewable fuels. A facility can also achieve this credit by utilizing alternative/low carbon fuels by the same options, except the required percentage increased to 60%. Suggested methods of reaching these goals include electric equipment, diesel hybrid vehicles, gas waste, and liquid fuels derived from solid waste. 

Documentation for this credit includes a list of all operational vehicles/equipment and their fuel source. The fraction of alternatively fueled equipment should be calculated, either from a fraction of vehicles or annual hours of operation. (See link for more details)

Case Studies and Benefits

International Finance Corporation Report on Alternative Fuels in the Cement Industry

This report conducted by the International Finance Corporation outlines the recommended practices in the production and utilization of alternative fuels in the cement industry. Information about fuels from industrial sludge, non-hazardous industrial waste, and municipal solid waste are detailed below. 

Additional Resources

Intent and Requirements 

Intent

To reduce atmospheric emissions associated with recovery of solid waste and promote renewable and low-carbon intensity alternatives to non-renewable transportation fuels.

Local Government & Industry Requirements

Demonstrate, on a percentage basis, the use of renewable or low-emission fuels 26 in the on-site vehicles/mobile equipment utilized in material recovery facilities, including MRFs, compost facilities, anaerobic digestion facilities, etc.

The percentage of renewable or alternative fuel use can be determined on the basis of either the fraction of the vehicles used on-site or the fraction of annual hours used.

Percentage of Alternative Fueled on-site mobile equipment:

  • 30 percent or more use of renewable Renewable fuels in onsite vehicles/mobile equipment or 30 percent or more total fuel consumption utilizes alternative/low-carbon fuelRenewable Fuels.

OR

  • 60 percent or more from Alternative/Low-Carbon alternative/low-carbon intensity fuels Fuels of on site mobile equipment or 60 percent or more total fuel consumption utilizes Alternative/Low-Carbon Fuels.alternative/low-carbon fuels.

Potential Strategies

  • Electric equipment
  • Utilize landfill methane
  • Utilize natural gas
  • Utilize Digester methane
  • Diesel Hybrids
  • Liquid fuels derived from solid waste

Why We Care

The goal of this credit is to reduce the atmospheric emission associated with recovery of solid waste and promote renewable and low-carbon intensity alternatives to non-renewable transportation fuels. 

Onsite mobile equipment contributes significantly to the atmospheric emissions of waste processing. In addition to fuel-consuming vehicles and machines that facilitate solid waste recovery, the process of anaerobic digestion releases significant amounts of methane, a detrimental greenhouse gas. This credit would include the use of alternatively-fueled on-site vehicles and equipment to alleviate the environmental impact of waste facilities while also encouraging the recycling of byproduct gases. 

How to Meet the Requirements

Demonstrate, on a percentage basis, the use of renewable or low-emission fuels in the on-site vehicles/mobile equipment utilized in material recovery facilities, including MRFs, compost facilities, anaerobic digestion facilities, etc.

Percentage of Alternative Fueled on-site mobile equipment:

  • 30 percent or more use of renewable Renewable fuels in onsite vehicles/mobile equipment or 30 percent or more total fuel consumption utilizes alternative/low-carbon fuelRenewable Fuels.

OR

  • 60 percent or more from Alternative/Low-Carbon alternative/low-carbon intensity fuels Fuels of on-site mobile equipment or 60 percent or more total fuel consumption utilizes alternative/low-carbon fuels.

Required Documentation

  • List of all operational vehicles/equipment 
  • Proof of renewable or alternative fuel source for each vehicle
  • The fraction of alternatively fueled equipment should be calculated, either from a fraction of vehicles or annual hours of operation. 

Case Studies & In-Depth Information

International Finance Corporation- Increasing the use of alternative fuels at cement plants

This report conducted by the International Finance Corporation outlines the best practice experience in the cement industry to improve their carbon footprints. The report focuses on the development of alternative fuels from a variety of sources. This summary highlights specifics relating to industrial sludge, non-hazardous industrial waste, and municipal solid waste. There are other alternative fuel sources that relate more specifically to the cement industry that have been omitted. 

Industrial sludge originates from the treatment of industrial effluent and can be divided into two types: biological and physico-chemical. In order to process sludge, several steps are necessary. First it has to be dried, both mechanically and thermally at the sewage plant. Next, it should be mixed with adsorbents, either sawdust for organic sludge, or limestone for oil sludge. 

Non-hazardous industrial waste originates from many different sources, including packaging wastes and paper recycling wastes. The processing of non-hazardous waste and conversion to SRF/RDF involves drying of the waste. 

Municipal solid waste is preprocessed in dedicated facilities which extract recyclables, treat the waste biologically through compost production or methanization, and drying to produce acceptable fuel. In comparison to landfilling or incineration, the utilization of municipal solid waste as fuel offers a space-saving and energy efficient solution that minimizes greenhouse gas emissions. 

While this report applies directly to the cement industry, it contains robust technical insights about alternative fuel production and can be a valuable tool resource for the waste industry. 

Referenced Standards

Definitions

Alternative/Low Carbon Fuels 

Electric equipment, diesel hybrid vehicles, gas waste, and liquid fuels derived from solid waste. 

Anaerobic Digestion 

EPA Definition: Anaerobic digestion is a process through which bacteria break down organic matter—such as manure—without oxygen. As the bacteria “work,” they generate biogas. The biogas that is generated is made mostly of methane, the primary component of natural gas.

SWANA Definition: Degradation of organic wastes in the absence of oxygen by microorganisms and bacteria, releasing methane that can be collected and used as a fuel and producing relatively inert solid materials that can be processed for use as a soil amendment. An example of Anaerobic Digestion is the waste degradation that occurs in a landfill.

Diesel Hybrids

A machine having an electric motor powered directly by a diesel-driven generator or by the batteries it charges.

Digester Methane

Methane produced as a result of anaerobic digestion.

Landfill Methane

EPA Definition: A natural byproduct of the decomposition of organic material in landfills. 

Definitions

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